Workshop “GenZ-Europe”

by Chris Scholz on July 5, 2016



The Book (2019)
The Academy of Management Meeting (2017)
The Conference (2016)
Next Steps
Some Links to Our Project

 

 

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The book (2019)

Christian Scholz/Anne Rennig (Eds.)

Generations Z in Europe: Inputs, Insights and Implications

 Preface
Christian Scholz & Anne Rennig (Saarland University, Saarbrücken, Germany)

A Introduction: Why talk about GenZ in Europe?

Christian Scholz (Saarland University, Saarbrücken, Germany)

B Input: What great thinkers would let us know

  1. How Karl Mannheim would have talked to us about Generation Z
    Christian Scholz (Saarland University, Saarbrücken, Germany)
  2. How McLuhan would have talked to us: the extension of generation in the global village
    Daria Vyugina (Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia)
  3. How Luhmann would have talked to us: Generations Z as Unique Subsystem
    Tobias Scholz (Universität Siegen, Germany)
  4. How Baudrillard would have talked to us: Generation Z and the hyperreal world
    Danica Čigoja Piper & Slavko Alčaković (Singidunum University, Belgrade, Serbia)
  5. A literary voice: how Romain Rolland would have talked to us
    Anne Rennig (Saarland University, Saarbrücken, Germany)
  6. How Berger and Luckmann would have talked to us
    Tobias Scholz (Universität Siegen, Germany)
  7. A short note on Generation Z: total flexibility without the nostalgia for solidity. How Zygmunt Bauman would have talked to us
    Miguel Chaves (Universidade Nova de Lisboa)
  8. About generations itself as a radical social change – an article not written by Julián Marías Aguilera
    Aart Bontekoning (Haaren, The Netherlands
  9. Generation Z and the end of culture – an article never written by Neil Postman
    Christian Scholz (Saarland University, Saarbrücken, Germany)

C  Insights: What the experts tell us

  1. The Generation Z in Spain: Digital socialization and intellectual capital
    María Victoria Sanagustín Fons (University of Zaragoza, Spain) & Ángeles Rubio Gil (King Juan Carlos University Madrid, Spain)
  2. The Generation Z in Great Britain: More of the same – High standards and demands
    Emma Parry & Valentina Battista (Cranfield University, Cranfield, United Kingdom)
  3. The Generation Z in France: Reverse socialization and social engagement
    Elodie Gentina (IESEG School of Management, Lille, France)
  4. The Generation Z in The Netherlands: Updating aging organizations
    Aart Bontekoning (Haaren, The Netherlands)
  5. The Generation Z in Italy: Misjudged, but high potential
    Valentina Cuzzocrea (University of Cagliari, Italy) & Sebastiano Benasso (University of Genoa, Italy)
  6. The Generation Z in Germany: Moving quietly into a quite different direction
    Christian Scholz & Lisa Grotefend (Saarland University, Saarbrücken, Germany)
  7. The Generation Z in Serbia: Ready for the great opening
    Slavko Alčakovič (Singidunum University, Belgrade, Serbia)
  8. The Generation Z in Bulgaria: Caught in individualism and needing a future perspective
    Mariya Karaivanova (St. Kliment Ohridsky University Sofia, Bulgaria) & Kristine Klein (Saarland University, Saarbrücken, Germany)
  9. The Generation Z in Russia: The digital divide of the Generation Putin
    Daria Vyugina (Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia)

D Implication: What do we want?

Tobias Scholz & Daria Vuygina (Universität Siegen, Germany / Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia)

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The Academy of Management Meeting Atlanta (2017)

 

Generation Z in Spain
Unemployment and optimism and both at the same time

María Victoria Sanagustín Fons

(University of Zaragoza)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Generation Z in the UK: More of the same – High standards and demands
Emma Parry (Cranfield University)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Generation Z in the Netherlands: Updating aging organisation
Aart Bontekoning (Generatiewerk)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Generation Z in Germany:
Moving quietly in the opposite direction as the official industry policy
Christian Scholz / Lisa Grotefend (Universität des Saarlandes)

 

 

 

Generation Z in Serbia:

Experienced two wars and is now ready for the great opening

Slavko Alčaković (Singidunum University)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Generation Z in Russia: The digital divide of the Generation Putin
Daria Vyugina (Lomonosov Moscow State University)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And here a part of our group in front of the AOM-logo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Initial Conference: : Nov. 27./28./29. 2016 in Saarbruecken, Germany

Opening in a typical restaurant in Saarbruecken

Goal of the Conference

Comparative analysis of similarities and differences of the “Gen Z in Europe” based, between others, on the following indicators:

  • attitude towards education,
  • working life
  • work-life balance;
  • levels of interaction and communication (digital / analog)

The findings should , between others, be matched with:

  • geographical
  • social
  • cultural
  • educational

environment and the fit to value systems for the European region. A group of researchers from important countries met to discuss these issues and plan form a powerful, long-lasting network.

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Participants

Country representatives:

 

 

Bulgaria: Mariya Karaivanova (St. Kliment Ohridski University, Sofia) & Kristine Klein (picture / Universität des Saarlandes, Saarbruecken)

 

 

Germany: Christian Scholz (Universität des Saarlandes, Saarbruecken)

 

 

Netherlands: Aart Bontekoning (Generatiewerk, Haaren)

 

 

 

 

Portugal: Miguel Chaves (Universidade Nova de Lisboa)

 

 

 

 

Russia: Daria Vyugina (Lomonosov Moscow State University)

 

 

 

 

Serbia: Slavko Alčakovic (Singidunum University, Belgrade)

 

 

 

 

Spain: Maria Victoria Sanagustin Fons (Universidad de Zaragoza)

 

 

 

 

Switzerland: Martina Mousson (gfs.bern ag)

 

 

 

UK: Emma Parry (Cranfield University, London)

 

Host:

This project is part of the research conducted at the Institute of Prof. Scholz dealing with Generation Z, with connection to the European Institute of Advanced Behavioural Management, and in particular with respect to the coordination activities to he Europa Kolleg Collegium Europium Universitatis Saraviensis (CEUS).

 

Organizers:

Prof. Dr. Christian Scholz, is the responsible for the content of the Workshop. Since 1986 he is with the University of Saarland and holds the Chair for Organizational Behaviour, HRM and Information Management. He is also founding director of the Europa-Institut at Saarland University (1990). From 2010 to 2012 he has been dean of the faculty of law and business. You can reach him via E-Mail scholz@orga.uni-sb.de .

 

 

Anne Rennig is Managing Director of the Collegium Europaeum (CEUS) at Saarland University. The institution’s research focus on Europe led her to the question whether there is an ‘European Generation Z’. Having originally a scientific background in Comparative Literature, the cooperation with Prof. Scholz was her first contact to the field of generational research. She found it quite interesting!

and:

  • Lisa Grotefend (Universität des Saarlandes)
  • Orkide Küman (Universität des Saarlandes)
  • Tobias Scholz (Universität Siegen)

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Next Steps

Currently we are

  1. thinking about it

We keep you up to date!

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Some Links to Our Project

 

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